FAQs – Stress Lessons- Tools for Resiliency

What is the evidence base for the program?

Stress Lessons: Tools for Resiliency was developed in collaboration with leading child, adolescent and school psychologists, as well as key educational administrators, counsellors and classroom teachers. The activities are grounded in evidence-based cognitive behavioural strategies, to help teens focus on how both good and bad stress impacts their body physically, emotionally and cognitively. 

 The program’s activities are based on a constructivist approach, acknowledging that learners construct knowledge and meaning from their experiences. This approach has been shown to successfully engage students in their own learning, recognizing that students come to school with previous knowledge, experience and skills related to stress they can share with others and build on within the classroom and broader school environment.

 Do I need special training to implement the program? 

Absolutely not! We have designed the program to include all of the components required to implement it in your setting. Each section includes detailed background information and notes to assist in preparation. While no special training is required in order to put the program to use, it may be possible to request a related workshop if it is available in your area. A range of formats may be available including a brief introductory session, half-day and full day workshops. For more information about training possibilities, email info@psychologyfoundation.org

 How does it connect to the curriculum in my jurisdiction?

Stress Lessons: Tools for Resiliency has great cross-curricular potential, and links directly to a range of curriculum areas in a variety of jurisdictions across Canada. For starters, we’ve identified the health and well-being related curriculum connections, see Curriculum Connections for more.

 You have two resources that include Grade 9 - Stress Lessons: From Stressed Out to Chilled Out (Grades 7-9), and Stress Lessons: Tools for Resiliency (9-12). How are the two programs different? 

We designed these resources to overlap as we know that in different areas of Canada, schools are configured differently, offering ranges of grades within one school setting. While the programs are similar in their goals, objectives and overall educational approach, they differ in that they are oriented to the specific developmental stages, social, emotional and academic challenges of the middle school and secondary school context.

 How has the program been evaluated?

Many of PFC’s programs for school settings, including Stress Lessons: From Stressed Out to Chilled Out, have been evaluated in a range of school boards, and have been shown to positively impact students’ self-perceived knowledge about the impacts of stress, and their awareness of a range of positive coping strategies.

 Are there similar programs out there?

A range of programs are available that focus on developing mental health literacy, mental illness awareness, developing social/emotional skills and the role mindfulness can play in educational settings. Stress Lessons: Tools for Resiliency is unique in that it specifically addresses the impact of stress on students, and the importance of developing resiliency skills as a means of promoting mental health and positive coping to keeping us healthy throughout our lives. It’s a research-based, competency-enhancement focused resource that has been developed in consultation with psychologists, educators and mental heath leaders across Canada. It builds on the successful track record established by all of PFC’s school-based programs.

 How much does this resource cost?

The resource costs $25 to download and $35 (plus shipping) for a printed copy. The prices are established on a cost recovery basis.

 Why are you charging for a download?

Stress Lessons: Tools for Resiliency was developed in collaboration with leading child, adolescent and school psychologists, as well as key educational administrators, counsellors and classroom teachers. The activities are grounded in evidence-based cognitive behavioural strategies, to help teens focus on how both good and bad stress impacts their body physically, emotionally and cognitively.  As a small charitable organization, The Psychology Foundation is charging for a download to help us cover some of our costs to develop this valuable and thorough resource, and to ensure we can keep producing more evidence based programs to foster resilience and promote mental wellbeing in communities across Canada

 Can I share with other colleagues who aren’t teachers?

This resource is relevant for a wide range of professionals working with high school-aged youth working in different settings. We encourage you to tell your colleagues about the resource, and share your ideas for partnership and implementation. As a small charitable organization, The Psychology Foundation asks that they download / purchase their own copy to help us cover some of our costs to develop the resources, and to ensure we can keep producing valuable programs to foster resilience and promote mental wellbeing in communities across Canada.

 Can the resource be used in other settings?

The program and its activities can be used in a variety of settings, including youth programming in after-school programs, arts-based, recreation and leadership programs, camps, and other places youth gather.

 Can we modify some of the guide and incorporate with other programs or does it have to be followed as is?

We have developed the guide to be delivered as a unit, as the activities build on one another to scaffold learning and develop skills. We recognize however that educators face multiple demands in the classroom, so we have designed the program to be flexible, and we encourage those using it to adapt as required for their context. We just ask that you stay true to the constructivist approach geared to fostering dialogue and promoting learning.

 Can we use this program with other age groups?

This resource is most appropriate for use within Secondary school settings or with youth aged 13-19, however it can be adapted for use with younger or older age groups. PFC has developed resources specifically for use with younger children, including Preschool and Kindergarten, Grades 1-3, Grades 4-6 and Grade 7-9, and Stress Strategies for adults.

 Is there a French version? 

We are currently working on a French version that will be available for the 2018/2019 school year.

 Do you have materials for other grade levels? 

The Psychology Foundation of Canada has a range of programs designed to meet the needs of Preschool and Kindergarten, Grades 1-3, Grades 4-6 and Grade 7-9. These programs have been successfully implemented in classrooms, educational and recreational settings across Canada and beyond.

 I’m looking for more information and tips for managing my own stress. Have anything? 

PFC has a wide range of programs and resources for parents and caregivers to help manage their own stress, such as Stress Strategies and Staying on Top of Your Game. We have also developed many resources to help parents and caregivers understand and respond to stress in children at all stages of development, including Make the Connection (for ages 0-3), Kids Have Stress Too! Parent program (ages 4-9), Parenting for Life booklets, and a series of tip sheets designed for parents/caregivers of pre-teens that are available in 8 languages.

 Why are there organizational logos on the resource?

The Psychology Foundation of Canada is a small charitable organization and we rely of the generous support of organizations, foundations and donors to enable us to continue to develop and deliver evidence based programs that help children and their families’ foster resilience and promote mental wellbeing.    We are fortunate enough to have partnered with TD Group, The Jackman Foundation and Ontario Trillium Foundation who supported the development of this new resource. 

 How can I provide feedback about the resource? 

We’d love your feedback and suggestions! Please get in touch with us as info@psychologyfoundation.org